Volume 4, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 27-31
Case Report: Treating Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis with Chinese Herbal Medicine Based on Macro Natural Law of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Bian Wei, Department of Rehabilitation, Chongqing Yongchuan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing, China
Wang Huanqun, Department of Neurology, Chongqing Yongchuan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing, China
Zou Weiwu, Department of Neurology, Chongqing Yongchuan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing, China
Gan Ting, Department of Neurology, Chongqing Yongchuan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing, China
Received: May 20, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 8, 2020;       Published: Jun. 20, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcm.20200402.13      View  211      Downloads  42
Abstract
Background: Over the past few decades, Expansion, Cryptococcus infection. Has become a worldwide Common fungal infections. Cryptococcus prevention has many difficulties in clinical application. Survivors Neurological sequelae are also common Cryptococcal Meningoencephal, CM. In China, Traditional Chinese Medicine tends to been used for poor fungal treatment or sequelae. Case presentation: We present a 47-year-old patient with cryptococcal encephalitis who’s clinical manifestations are atypical, and it is easy to misdiagnose. The first symptom was headache after tooth extraction, followed by fever. The diagnosis was confirmed 6 months after the onset of the disease. After antifungal treatment for 18 days, Headache and fever not reduced and multiple adverse effects such as impaired internal organs. The use of antifungal therapy has serious adverse reactions and poor treatment effects. When the disease is in critical condition, the modern medical antifungal treatment is ineffective and resistant to help. Using traditional Chinese medicine theory, it acknowledges the harmonious unity between man and nature, instead of looking for better resistance Fungal drugs, but by changing the internal environmental stability of the body, after 5 days of initial treatment, the patient no longer had fever, headache, snore, appetite restored and normal bowel movements, the nervous system function gradually recovers. No fever or headache occurred within 5 months, neurological function gradually recovered, head MRI improved, and cerebrospinal fluid culture was negative. After 7 months, the patient still had no fever, headache, snore, he can take care of himself, normal language expression can be done, farm work at home, one person can do food shopping and cooking, etc., limb muscle strength is normal, muscle tension is not high, No positive neurological examination. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese medicine modalities may be considered for treatment When western medicine treatment of cryptococcal encephalitis is not effective, based on appropriate syndrome pattern assessment.
Keywords
Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Herbs
To cite this article
Bian Wei, Wang Huanqun, Zou Weiwu, Gan Ting, Case Report: Treating Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis with Chinese Herbal Medicine Based on Macro Natural Law of Traditional Chinese Medicine, International Journal of Chinese Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2020, pp. 27-31. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcm.20200402.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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